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MTH 200W Transition to Advanced Math: Distinguish Scholarly vs. Popular Sources

Scholarly and Popular Sources

What is Peer Review?

Peer Review is the process by which an article is evaluated by a group of specialists in its given field prior to being "accepted" for publication.

It attempts to certify that published articles meet a standard of accuracy, originality, and scholarly integrity.

Watch the video below and please meet with a librarian or ask at the Q&i Desk to get help in finding peer reviewed material. We are happy to help.

Is My Source Scholarly?

Source Level

Here are a few criteria for determining if your source is scholarly:
Author(s) credentials - are they experts working or teaching in this field of study?
Length - is it a few brief paragraphs or a longer, more substantive article?
Language - is it written for other scholars in the field?  Do they used specialized or technical language specific to this field of study?     
References - is the author(s) citing other scholars in this field of study? Do they have a robust reference list?
Journal or Book Type - If it's a journal article, what kind of journal is the article is published in?  Is it a scholarly journal, or even peer reviewed?  If it’s a book, is it published by a university press or other well-respected commercial publisher known for publishing scholarly works?

Reading strategies for vetting sources for close reading

Using CRAAP to Evaluate Sources

Applying the "CRAAP" test to your sources can help you decide if they are credible or relevant enough for your purposes. Check the image below for a description of the "CRAAP" test: