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WRT 105 What Makes a Leader? (Schaefer): Distinguish Scholarly vs. Popular Sources

Is My Source Scholarly?

Source Level

Here are a few criteria for determining if your source is scholarly:
Author(s) credentials - are they experts working or teaching in this field of study?
Length - is it a few brief paragraphs or a longer, more substantive article?
Language - is it written for other scholars in the field?  Do they used specialized or technical language specific to this field of study?     
References - is the author(s) citing other scholars in this field of study? Do they have a robust reference list?
Journal or Book Type - If it's a journal article, what kind of journal is the article is published in?  Is it a scholarly journal, or even peer reviewed?  If it’s a book, is it published by a university press or other well-respected commercial publisher known for publishing scholarly works?

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What is Peer Review?

Peer Review is the process by which an article is evaluated by a group of specialists in its given field prior to being "accepted" for publication.

It attempts to certify that published articles meet a standard of accuracy, originality, and scholarly integrity.

Watch the video below and please meet with a librarian or ask at the Q&i Desk to get help in finding peer reviewed material. We are happy to help.