Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

WRTG 105 Uncertainty (Phillips): Library Session

Getting started

Click this link for a Google Doc you can copy and edit: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1I8whVYExiWkd30Xi9EXkwOQEwo1WQ45fxs5a75ow04w/edit?usp=sharing 

Library Session Handout - Brainstorming - it’s not just one step, it’s a staircase.

Librarian: Eileen Daly-Boas    libguides.lib.rochester.edu/EDU 

1. Write about your question or topic, or review your notes (5 min)

  • What are you curious about?

  • What are the opposing opinions?

  • What are the terms that scholars use when discussing this?

  • Are there particular people or scholars involved in this question?

Pre-research: Where do you get ideas for the right kind of terms? Wikipedia, google, news, friends? Take a few minutes to look around. If you like google, fine - just remember, we’re just getting the landscape. Try to think of some source that you have some trust in with respect to your topic. 

2. Look at what you’ve already written, and pick out possible Search Terms 

Concept 1:

OR

OR

OR

AND

Concept 2:

OR

OR

OR

AND

Concept 3:

OR

OR

OR

3. Go to  https://www.library.rochester.edu/ and click “Advanced Search” (.https://rochester.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/discovery/search?tab=Everything&search_scope=MyInst_and_CI&vid=01ROCH_INST:UR01&mode=advanced&offset=0

Start by seeing what’s happening in the the field currently, use these filters

  • Peer-reviewed journals (under “availability”)

  • Articles (under “content type”)

  • Publication date (try limiting to 5 years)

Click “remember all filters”   

 Locate one result that looks interesting and fill in below. If you couldn’t find something, go to step 4.
  

Author(s):

Article Title::

Journal Title:

Volume no.:

Issue no.:

Page nos.:

Date:

DOI no. or stable URL:

4. First pass at narrowing your topic (or, if it’s really narrow, expanding it)

  • Who - what group are you considering? Can you narrow by gender, age, political views?
  • Where - can you narrow the place? Geographical or by where people are - school, work, events
  • When - can you narrow the time frame?
  • How - can you limit to a particular methodology/effect? 
  • What - the term for what you’re investigating the right term? (you may need to go back to step 1)

Now try step 3 again, and find one result that looks interesting or relevant. 

5. Find at least one relevant study cited by the article(s) found during the exercise above. (Citing Backward)

 Places to find these articles mentioned include:

  • Lit review, introduction, background
  • Works Cited/ Bibliography/References

Author(s):

Article Title::

Journal Title:

Volume no.:

Issue no.:

DOI no. or stable URL:

6. Use Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.com/ ) to find at least one relevant study that cites the article(s) found during the exercises above. (Citing Forward)

Author(s):

Article Title::

Journal Title:

Volume no.:

Issue no.:

DOI no. or stable URL: