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WRTG 105 Moral of the Story: Allegory as Form and Practice (Gilbert) : Home

Databases

Finding ebooks

River Campus Libraries provides access to over one million e-books covering a large variety of disciplines and publishers. Because our e-books are available through different databases and websites, the easiest way to find an e-book in UR’s collection is to start on the library's homepage and choose "Library Catalog" from the dropdown box.

To narrow your search to e-books, choose the Click to access resource and Book/e-book filters from the options on the left-hand side of your results (Show Me)...or use the search box below.

E-books

The library also has several collections of e-books that are worth searching in for your topic. While books in these collections are pulled into all of our catalog searches, relevant titles can sometimes get buried within thousands of results. Try searching these databases directly for e-books on your topic:

Choosing the right database

Ask yourself what type of source is more likely to have the information you need and how will I use this source?:

  • News articles?
  • Scholarly journal articles?
  • Empirical studies?
  • Data and statistics?
  • Primary documents?

Deciding the most likely source will help determine which database to use. Different databases are composed of information from different types of sources.  BEAM is a method for helping you decide how you might use a source.

Ask yourself if the database you select provides full-text, or only citations and /or abstracts:

  • If the database you need to use does not have full-text, use the or  buttons.
  • If you have a citation, use the Citation Search Tool to locate the full-text.

Understand the scope of the database you select. Ask yourself:

  • Does this database cover the subject area (discipline) I really need, or is there a better, more focused database?
  • Does this database provide indexing for the date range I need?
  • Will this database point me to or provide the full-text for articles written during the time period that is appropriate for my research need?

Although retrospective materials are sometimes added to databases, the actual article you need might not be available electronically, because it is too old or too new. 

Ask yourself if there are special advanced features that can improve your search results or make searching easier:

  • Does this database allow me to limit my search to a specific date range, or to a particular magazine or journal?
  • Does this database allow me to email, download, or export articles to my citation manager like Zotero or RefWorks?
  • Are there features that can help me to generate better search terms, like the Thesaurus feature or the "Browse Subject Headings" features in some databases?

Humanities Librarian

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Pauline Schwartzman
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        Chat is unavailable, feel free to email me.      
   
Contact:
Learning Initiatives
Rush Rhees Library, 755 Library Road, Rochester, NY 14627
585-275-9296