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WRTG 103 EAPP Critical Reading, Reasoning, and Writing (Bayne)

Scholarly Articles

Multidisciplinary Databases

Discipline Specific Databases

News Articles

Finding Policy

Hierarchy of grey literature denoting the varying degrees of information control and known expertise of the author.The policy databases and the open web provide a plethora of resources for finding information about and from governmental and non-govermental organizations working to address issues surrounding your topic.  In addition to websites, you'll find what scholars refer to as grey literature.

What is grey literature?
Information published by entities whose main purpose is NOT publishing (government and non-government organizations, think tanks, scholarly societies and associations, etc​. Watch this video for more info.)

Why is grey literature important?
A large amount of public policy information is published as grey literature.

Image source: Kamei, F. et al., (2020) under a CC BY 4.0 license         

Using advance Google searching to locate grey literature

Below are a few advanced Google searching tips for find grey literature:  

  1. Try using Google Advanced Search
  2. Include search terms like report OR analysis OR summary OR overview OR data
  3. Google ignores the word AND as a search operator. But, typing OR in all caps will find similar or related terms [e.g. "racial segregation" OR "modern segregation" OR "concentrated poverty"].
  4. Search for a particular document type [e.g. denver (hispanic OR latino) population filetype:xls].
  5. Search at particular site [e.g. site:.rochester.edu OR site:cityofrochester.gov OR site:census.gov OR pewresearch.org].
  6. Search a particular domain [e.g.  site:.gov OR  site:.org  OR site:.uk  See a full list of country code domains].
  7. Exclude words by using the "-" sign in front of the word you wish to exclude [e.g. denver (hispanic OR latino) -migrants].