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CHEM 275 - Chemistry of Poisons

Library resources to support the work of students in chm 275.

Getting Started with Wikipedia

Wikipedia has three core content standards that all entries must follow. As you work on updating an entry, keep these standards in mind:

Neutral Point of View (NPOV)  Editors should "write the things that almost everyone agrees about, and make them the main point of the article." Wikipedia is not a platform to advance agendas or debate an argument; it is a source for the world to use for background information on a topic or idea. According to Wikipedia, "Instead of essay-like, argumentative, or opinionated writing, Wikipedia articles should have a straightforward, just-the-facts style. The goal of a Wikipedia article is to create a comprehensive and neutrally written summary of existing mainstream knowledge about a topic." (More info)

Verifiability (V)  Editors should include information that can be easily verified by other sources outside Wikipedia. It is important that you rely on pre-existing research to back-up your claims and cite your sources! (More info)

No Original Research (NOR)  Wikipedia is not a platform to publish new arguments, theories, or ideas. It is important that the content you add is based on reliable, secondary sources. The phrase "secondary source" is used in a more humanistic sense in this case to refer to sources that "make analytic, synthetic, interpretive, explanatory, or evaluative claims"...as opposed to primary sources which are documents and items created at the time an event occurred.  According to Wikipedia's guidelines, scholarly journal articles and published research studies are secondary sources and are appropriate to cite in an entry. (More info)

Editing Wikipedia

Creating Your Sandbox

Wikipedia sandboxes are a great way to work on editing an article without making direct edits to a live entry. While your sandbox is considered your own personal space on Wikipedia's website, anyone that knows your username can access your sandbox's contents so you should avoid including personal information or any other information that you wouldn't want to be made public for all time (information on Wikipedia is not easily removed...it remains in an entry's version history).

All users are given a default sandbox to work in, but you can also create sandboxes for specific projects. Creating a project-specific sandbox is an effective way to retain a record of your contributions to an entry and manage multiple editing projects at the same time. To create a sandbox for your CHM 275 project, follow these directions:

  Creating a Project Sandbox
Editing an Existing Article in Your Sandbox

The easiest way to edit an existing article is to copy the content of the existing article into your sandbox; then, you can work on editing each section without accidentally overwriting the live site. Follow the steps using the links below to copy and edit existing content in your sandbox:

  Copy Existing Content into Your Sandbox
  Editing a Section of a Wikipedia Entry
Adding Links to Your Entry

There are two types of links on Wikipedia – internal links and external links.

Internal links, also known as wikilinks, point to other Wikipedia entries or content. When you are looking at an article and you see a word displayed in blue, that's a wikilink. The purpose of wikilinks is to help users quickly connect with related articles and provide context around the terms used in an entry. If you see a link displayed in red, that means that a Wikipedia entry matching that term does not exist.

  Adding Internal Links (Wikilinks)

External links point to websites outside of Wikipedia. These links are also displayed in blue, but are followed by a symbol to let you know that the link points to a non-Wikipedia source. Wikipedia encourages you to limit the use of external links except when a site contains "meaningful, relevant content that is not suitable for inclusion in an article". Additional guidelines on using external links can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:External_links.

  Adding External Links
Adding Images to Your Entry

Wikipedia requires that you use images that are part of the Wikimedia Commons.  You can search the Wikimedia Commons for images uploaded by other users or upload an image of your own.  To incorporate an image into your Wikipedia entry choose one of the following options:

  Use an Image from Wikimedia Commons
  Add Your Own Image (Upload to Wikimedia Commons)
Adding Citations/References

Wikipedia has a built-in citation feature that makes it relatively easy to add citations to your entry. If you are creating a new entry, or editing an existing entry without a references list, you will also need to add a reference list – directions for both of these processes are below:

  Adding a Citation/Reference
  Adding a Reference List

Chemistry on Wikipedia

Is My Source Scholarly?

Source Level

Here are a few criteria for determining if your source is scholarly:
Author(s) credentials - are they experts working or teaching in this field of study?
Length - is it a few brief paragraphs or a longer, more substantive article?
Language - is it written for other scholars in the field?  Do they used specialized or technical language specific to this field of study?     
References - is the author(s) citing other scholars in this field of study? Do they have a robust reference list?
Journal or Book Type - If it's a journal article, what kind of journal is the article is published in?  Is it a scholarly journal, or even peer reviewed?  If it’s a book, is it published by a university press or other well-respected commercial publisher known for publishing scholarly works?

Wikipedia Images

Image Sources
Images should be SVG, or PNG, or JPEG.  

 

Create your own image